People of the Spirit, worshiping Jesus in all places, at all times

Archive for September, 2016

Every Tribe, Tongue, People, and Language…

Ferguson. Houston. Baltimore. Charlotte. Tulsa. These names may well come to have the same powerful association that Selma, Birmingham, and Atlanta have in our remembrance of the Civil Rights Movement. These cities–and many others– bear witness to racial tensions, conflicts, and the demonic insistence that (a) we can and should be valued based on the color of our skin and (b) that the systems of the American continent are blind to such judgments.

Oh, yes. Racism is certainly demonic. And the idea that the experiences of people of color in America are equal to or have advantage over white Americans is a demonic lie. These things are demonic because they fly in the face of our common humanity, sharing the image of God, descending from the same first parents (Genesis 1-2). They fly in the face of our common fall into sin (pick any citation: as Chesterton notes, the doctrine of original sin has plenty of empirical evidence). They fly in the face of God’s revelation through the prophets and ultimately, through Christ Himself, that all people would be joined together as one nation gathered to worship the One True God (Joel 2, various Psalms, Matthew 28, Acts 2, Revelation 5, etc.). They fly in the face that Jesus has united us all through His blood (Ephesians 2)

This great redemption and reconciliation of people groups divided by sin (Tower of Babel, anyone) isn’t some mere footnote. It’s a consequence of Pentecost. It’s the creation of a Church–a holy people– that is truly catholic. The roots of the Pentecostal movement put the reconciliation of all peoples at center stage, as the common experience of the Holy Spirit bound people together in praise of Jesus and life together following Him. And the God of this Church will not brook denial, and he does not sanction self-deceit.

To be white in America is, in some sense, its own kind of wealth. It’s almost always a free pass to walk down the street, to speed down the highway, and to ride your bike home in a hurry on a late night. It’s a freedom to submit your resume without fear of judgment based on your name, or to show up to an interview and find a prospective employer unsurprised by your appearance. It’s a right to protest and advocate for lives under threat without any fear of reprisal, or assumption of guilt. I could belabor the point, but I will not. (Note: I will not suggest that white Americans never experience any of these things, but that they are not par for the course or expectation that they must prepare their children for).

Over the past year, I’ve heard from hundreds of my brothers and sisters in Christ–white, black, brown, and multi-racial–on social media, blogs, newspapers, and magazines, and what they tell me is appalling: injustice, oppression, fear, doubt, anxiety, anger, and a host of complex experiences and emotions that, despite my best efforts, I find impossible to identify with. I’ve only gotten far enough with it to be able to say it’s utterly wrong, unacceptable, and not to be condoned by the people of God.

Friends, this world is broken. Our culture’s systemic preference for white people is an artificial and demonic division of the human race which God has acted to redeem and reconcile once for all. I don’t know what our next steps have to look like, but I do know they involve repentance, asking forgiveness, praying and worshipping together as one people and seeking Jesus to do in us what he’s been doing in the world all along. Because if there’s going to be a witness against the sins of our culture, that witness needs to be the counter-example of the Church. May God make us one, and may we love one another deeply, as Christ has loved us.

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Tradition and Tongues

I’m a church planter by practice and pretense (depending on the day, as few of us pull off wearing that hat non-stop). Church planting is by nature an interesting animal. It has that “new car” or “new book” smell all over it. And it’s tempting, because of that, for folks to walk into a church planting effort and expect that everything will be brand new–a church as fresh as the day of Pentecost.

Well, sort of. New works involve lots of Pentecost-type things: reaching out, sharing Jesus, baptizing everybody, and figuring out what it looks like to disciple and to gather for worship. They have a lot of the same growing pains that the book of Acts and the epistles of Paul bear witness to, as well. There are leadership questions, and cultural challenges, and discipleship gaps and experiments.

But that’s not all. Church plants have DNA–they have parents, friends, and bickering cousins who all have an opinion on the shape of things. In other words, there is tradition to take note of. For Pentecostals ministering in the Anglican Church or others in the catholic tradition, this isn’t a negative thing at all. As it’s been noted many times, tradition is a life-giving thing in Pentecostal discipleship.

But what does that look like in church planting? Tradition is what we are passing on in discipleship. Tradition maps out how we follow Jesus together. So, for an Anglican like myself, what that looks like includes:

  • When sharing stories and other texts from Scripture, the point of every single one is to reveal Jesus (Christological reading)
  • We pray together corporately, even the kids outreach has us reciting corporate prayer.
  • We make use of liturgical prayer. For example, baptism candidates will receive a small booklet including daily prayers derived from the family offices from the prayerbook.
  • We value the church year–Advent, Christmas, Lent, and Easter are especially highlighted in our children’s outreach, and I hope they will be an influence in our small groups as well.

So, yes, tradition provides hands-on discipleship for life in the Spirit as we are all attempting to follow Jesus together. Practice it personally and embrace it’s application in ministry–especially in new ministry like church planting.